NEWS: HOLLOW CITY Leads “Unaccompanied Minors” Exhibit at MoMA

From the Global Lens Collection and MoMA’s Department of Film comes Global Lens filmmaker Maria Joao Ganga’s powerful exploration of innocence and Angola…

We’re very pleased to announce that one of our most favorite curators, and educators, Anne Morra, at the Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Film, has put together a spectacular new film exhibit titled Unaccompanied Minors: From Feeding the Bay to the Hollow City, to run July 22nd-August 14th, in tandem with the Museum’s Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000 gallery exhibit. Thirty-one short- and feature-length films are included the exhibit, at the exhibit’s core is Global Lens Collection film HOLLOW CITY :

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SUPPORT: Change the Way You See the World

Because in an empathic civilization, ‘monkey see, monkey do’ isn’t such a bad thing

Empathic Civilization

WATCH: The Empathic Civilization (courtesy of RSA Animate and Jonathan Rifkin)

Not long ago, Emma Rae Lierley, Administrative Coordinator at GFI, sent me a link to a video on “The Empathic Civilization” (right). Her rationale in sending it was that she felt it encapsulated the basic premise upon which Global Lens was founded: that in our most sympathetic state of human existence, we are all connected.

Of course, nowadays, we hear such things all the time. Technological evolution has certainly connected us with the world outside our physical boundaries. Intellectual curiosity has always found a way to merge minds above borders. And then, without doubt, there is religion.

All are valid points of connection, connectivity. But the video makes a much more basic point. It says that we, as humans, are predisposed to having shared feelings and emotions, or an “empathic” relationship with one another that intuitively draws us together, as a people (see the video’s example of ‘monkey see, monkey do’).

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Oday Rasheed on the Making of QARANTINA and Remaking Baghdad in Today’s Iraq

Rob Avila and Iraqi director Oday Rasheed discuss the genesis of inspiration against a backdrop of war, politics and filmmaking

Iraqi director Oday Rasheed talks to Rob Avila during the premiere of Global Lens 2012 at MoMA

Oday Rasheed is one of only a small handful of filmmakers working and producing in Iraq today. His first feature, Underexposure (2005), captured the immediate aftermath of the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in a fictional documentary-style story about a Baghdad filmmaker trying to make sense of the tumult of this period. Soon after its debut, Rasheed left the growing sectarian violence in Baghdad for Berlin, where he immersed himself in film studies, gravitating to the works of Andrei Tarkovsky, among others, and eventually developed the script for his second feature, Qarantina. He returned to Baghdad in 2008 to make the film, which was completed in 2010.

Qarantina is one of ten awarding-winning films featured in the Global Lens 2012 series, premiering this January at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). Oday was able to attend his Global Lens screening in New York as part of a short U.S. tour that includes multiple screenings at MoMA, and a presentation of the film at the Council on Foreign Relations on January 25th, and also at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service on January 30th.

Recently, during the premiere of Global Lens

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NEW ON DVD: Adrift and My Tehran For Sale!

Lust, Longing and Chuyen’s ADRIFT and Granaz Moussavi’s Controversial MY TEHRAN FOR SALE to release on DVD January 31st

We’re pleased to announce the DVD release of two new films from the Global Lens film series, featuring a charged performance by Vietnamese actress Hai Yen and Moussavi’s “hit and run” chronicle of Tehran’s underground art scene:

 

Adrift DVD CoverADRIFT (CHOI VOI), dir. Bui Thac Chuyen, Vietnam, 2009, 110 minutes, Vietnamese, with subtitles in English

A young wife, ignored by her immature spouse, is caught in a love triangle between her best friend and a handsome stranger during a languorous summer in Hanoi. FIPRESCI Prize, Venice International Film Festival; Official Selection of the International Film Festival Rotterdam (Bright Future).

A subtle, melancholy exploration of erotic angst and uncomfortable awakening…Adrift evokes a culture whose puritanical restraints have begun to loosen, allowing dangerous sparks to fly. Once desire has been unleashed, smugly settling for less is no longer a comfortable option.“ -The New York Times

Beautiful, and tightly focused on the emotional, romantic, and sexual lives of men and women in Hanoi….This is new Vietnamese cinema.” -diaCRITICS

 

My Tehran For Sale DVD CoverMY TEHRAN FOR SALE, dir. Granaz Moussavi, Iran, 2009, 95 minutes, Farsi and English, with subtitles in English

An

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Global Lens 2012 @ MoMA!

Our ninth season opens January 12th in New York with the director, cast and crew of TOLL BOOTH

The new year is just a few weeks away, and with it comes launch of Global Lens 2012 at the Museum of Modern Art, January 12th-28th! The presentation, as many of you know, is part of our annual and ongoing collaboration with the Museum, and is organized by Jytte Jensen, Senior Curator in MoMA’s Department of Film. And what can we say except…

It’s one of our best series yet. Global Lens 2012 includes GREY MATTER, the first narrative feature film produced in Rwanda by a native Rwandan filmmaker; the oh-so-lovable Farfan, star of FAT, BALD SHORT MAN (the first-ever rotoscope feature for Global Lens); and top picks from Pusan, FESPACO, Morelia and Guadalajara international film festivals (and, not to mention, Albania’s official submission to the Oscars: AMNESTY).

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Film Festivals Celebrate Human Rights (The Korea Herald)

The North Korean Human Rights Film Festival and the Independence, Democracy Film Festival bring DOOMAN RIVER (Global Lens 2011) and other influential films to Seoul

A scene from Zhang Lu's DOOMAN RIVER

(via The Korea Herald) Two human rights-themed film festivals open in Seoul this month ― a rare opportunity to experience a wide range of socially conscious documentaries and feature-length films.

The first North Korean Human Rights Film Festival, which kicks off on Nov. 10 at Lee Hae-rang Arts Theater of Dongguk University in Seoul, brings together 10 non-fiction and feature films that delve into human rights conditions in the communist country.…Korean-Chinese director Zhang Lu’s feature film “Dooman River” presents a story of an ethnic Korean boy who lives in a Chinese province that shares its border with Hamgyeong Province in North Korea. His life is turned upside down when he befriends a North Korean boy who often crosses the border ― through the Duman River ― in secret, to find food in the Chinese town. [more…]

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Iranian Actress Marzieh Vafamehr Released from Prison

The Global Film Initiative is pleased to announce that Marzieh Vafamehr, Iranian actress and star of MY TEHRAN FOR SALE (Global Lens 2010), has been released from prison after being sentenced to a year in jail and 90 lashes. See below for more information:

Marzieh Vafamehr, in a scene from MY TEHRAN FOR SALE

October 27, 2011: Release of actress Marzieh Vafamehr highlights plight of persecuted filmmakers (Amnesty International)

(via Amnesty International) Marzieh Vafamehr, who was arrested after starring in the Australian film My Tehran for Sale, was released on Monday night. One scene in the film shows her without the head-covering Iranian women are required to wear, while she appears to drink alcohol in another. The actress seems to have been released after an appeal court reduced her imprisonment to three months and overturned the flogging sentence. [more…]

October 9, 2011: MY TEHRAN FOR SALE Star to be Lashed 90 Times (The Telegraph) Iranian actress sentenced to a year in jail and 90 lashes for her role in a film about the limits imposed on artists in the Islamic republic

(via The Telegraph) Marzieh Vafamehr’s sentence was reported by an Iranian opposition website on Sunday. “A verdict has been issued for Marzieh Vafamehr, sentencing her to a year in

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MY TEHRAN FOR SALE Star Behind Bars (The Australian)

The fate of Marzieh Vafamehr, the star of the Australian film MY TEHRAN FOR SALE, remains in limbo after she was jailed in Iran.

Iranian actress Marzieh Vafarmehr in MY TEHRAN FOR SALE

(via The Australian) Although the Iranian judiciary said she would be released on bail last week, she is believed to still be imprisoned. Vafamehr starred in the South Australian-financed and produced film that was filmed largely guerilla-style in Iran. She appeared in the film—which is now more than two years old—without a hijab and shaved her head, though the reason for her imprisonment remains unclear other than being part of a broader Iranian crackdown. [more…]

NEWS: DOOMAN RIVER vs. the Dooman River

The Global Lens 2011 standout is playing to audiences everywhere, but what does the film really say about the Dooman River?

A few months ago, a moviegoer sent us an email after watching Zhang Lu’s film, DOOMAN RIVER (featured in Global Lens 2011), and said it’s good we’re “raising awareness about what’s happening around the River”…

And, it was an interesting comment, because what’s happening in the film is a story of two young friends caught in a refugee crisis. But who could really say people were now more aware of what’s ‘happening around the River,’ because they’d seen a film by the same name (or rather, even if audiences were more aware of this river/border between China, North Korea and Russia, what exactly did they know about it?)

In the 90s, the Dooman was a common border-crossing for North Koreans fleeing famine, and the film paints a bleak but beautiful portrait of that [ongoing] refugee crisis—and an equally miserable but mesmerizing visage of the river itself, polluted with physical refuse and the overwhelming weight of transnational border politics. This is what we know, and say in our description of the film.

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