Global Lens 2012 @ MoMA!

Our ninth season opens January 12th in New York with the director, cast and crew of TOLL BOOTH

The new year is just a few weeks away, and with it comes launch of Global Lens 2012 at the Museum of Modern Art, January 12th-28th! The presentation, as many of you know, is part of our annual and ongoing collaboration with the Museum, and is organized by Jytte Jensen, Senior Curator in MoMA’s Department of Film. And what can we say except…

It’s one of our best series yet. Global Lens 2012 includes GREY MATTER, the first narrative feature film produced in Rwanda by a native Rwandan filmmaker; the oh-so-lovable Farfan, star of FAT, BALD SHORT MAN (the first-ever rotoscope feature for Global Lens); and top picks from Pusan, FESPACO, Morelia and Guadalajara international film festivals (and, not to mention, Albania’s official submission to the Oscars: AMNESTY).

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FESTIVALS & AWARDS: Malatya IFF, Cinema Tropical Awards, Thessaloniki IFF and more!

THE FINGER points the way to success, OCTOBER has another great month, and WHEN I SAW YOU’s audience likes what it sees…

GLOBAL LENS FILMS:

 

THE FINGER (dir. Sergio Teubal, Argentina) was awarded Best Screenplay, Best Actor, and Best Score at the Malatya International Film Festival in Ankara, Turkey! THE FINGER will premiere as part of the Global Lens 2012 film series in January at MoMA—watch the film trailer here!

 

GFI GRANT RECIPIENTS:

ON THE EDGE (2011 GFI grant recipient), directed by Leila Kilani of Morocco, received the following awards:

FIPRESCI Prize, Films from the South Festival (Oslo, Norway) Best International Feature-Length Film, International Antalya Golden Orange Film Festival (Antalya, Turkey) Film Critics’ Jury Prize, Most Innovative Film, Tübingen-Stuttgart International French-language Film Festival (Tubingen, Germany) Special Jury Prize and Best Actress, Brussels International Independent Film Festival (Brussels, Belgium) Grand Prize, Arte Mare Festival du Film et des Cultures Mediterraneennes (Bastia, France) Special Mention, Continue reading FESTIVALS & AWARDS: Malatya IFF, Cinema Tropical Awards, Thessaloniki IFF and more!

FEATURE: 3 on 1: Frequent Flyer Benefits

It's the most, wonderful, time of the year.

Global Lens Series Manager Jeremy Quist and Marketing & Publicity Manager Hilary Lawson share their experiences on the road, while a special guest weighs in on American cinema from an international perspective…

Traveling. Around this time of year, it tends to get a bad rap. Everyone can relate to long lines, the affects of jet lag and the questionable quality of airplane food. However, in all the groaning and moaning, the bigger picture of why we travel in the first place can get lost. After all, what’s a bit of a stiff neck in comparison to the joy of visiting friends and family, getting a change of scenery, and adding new people and experiences to your life?

Admittedly, this might be easier for us to say, as the GFI staff has recently returned from some unforgettable trips. Santhosh Daniel (Director of Programs) attended the 16th Busan International Film Festival, Hilary Lawson (Marketing & Publicity Manager) traveled to the 52nd Thessaloniki International Film Festival, Jeremy Quist (Global Lens Series Manager) was invited as an honorary

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OSCARS!!!

[UPDATE – October 1, 2011: GFI grantee SKOONHEID is also going to the Oscars! See full post about all awards here]

Congratulations to Ahmed Imamovic, and Daniel and Diego Vega! Ahmed’s second film, BELVEDERE (currently featured in Global Lens 2011), is Bosnia-Herzegovina’s official submission to the 2011 Academy Awards! And not to be outdone, the Vega brothers’ debut feature [and 2008 GFI grant-recipient], OCTOBER, is Peru’s official submission!

We wish both films much success, with fingers crossed for a golden Oscar (and a clandestine note of luck for GFI grantee Dervis Zaim, whose film SHADOWS AND FACES, is short-listed as Turkey’s official submission)!

SUPPORT: Srebrenica and a Generation of Consciousness

Thoughts on BELVEDERE, ORDINARY PEOPLE and a quiet day in July

Remembering Srebrenica: a scene from Ahmed Imamovic's BELVEDERE

Srebrenica. A salt-mining town in Bosnia near the Serbian border, small and unassuming, like any semi-rural enclave. Yet, in 1995, it gained notoriety as the site of one of modern history (and warfare’s) most epic acts of genocide: an unparalleled massacre of human life, 8,000 mostly Muslim men and boys on a quiet day in July, that for years has breathed like an open wound, gone without closure and, seemingly disappeared from global public consciousness.

Until recently. In late-spring, the arrest and extradition of General Ratko Mladić (the individual widely believed to be the orchestrator of the Srebrenica massacre) to the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), thrust the event back into a global spotlight. Mladić is the last of some 150+ fugitives identified by the United Nations as having committed war crimes during the Balkans conflict of the 1990s and his arrest—coupled with this summer’s arrest of accused war criminal, Goran Hadzic—marks another phase in the continuing odyssey of Balkans nations to move beyond the tragic inertia of its past.

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SUPPORT: You Say “Tomato” and I Say “Tomahto”

Global Lens and promoting a difference of opinion for the sake of diversity

Global Lens: grindhouse, arthouse, our house

Every year, we do our best to bring you the best in independent world cinema. And over the years, if there’s one thing we’ve learned, it’s that tastes vary from person to person and often what we see in a film isn’t always the same as what you see…

Earlier this year, we released what some audiences describe[d] as a “slasher” film–and others describe as an iconic representation of the “Indian New Wave.” For us, Sidharth Srinivasan’s SOUL OF SAND is an eccentric thriller that ‘delves into the dark interstices between Indian modernity and tradition,’ and for Memphis-based critic, John Beifuss:

“A blunt horror-art hybrid… With one foot in the arthouse and the other in the grindhouse.” [more]

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